Beef Stock

Beef stock is a great base to start with, while simple in its own right, it can help add wonderful complexities to many dishes, and be transformed into some pretty amazing creations with time.

The ingredients can vary by availability, but when looking for bones it’s very helpful to find meaty chunks on the outside, and thick healthy marrow inside. I usually just buy scrap bones when I’m at the grocery store, usually less than a dollar a pack, and freeze them until I have enough to make a batch.

7 quarts beef stock

7 quarts, canned for the freezer

Ingredients

  • 2lbs or so of beef bones (scrap bones, soup bones, oxtails you want some meat on them)
  • 1 can of tomato puree
  • 5 black peppercorns
  • 5 allspice berries
  • 2 medium onions chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled
  • 2 sticks celery, washed and broken in half
  • half head of garlic with the top cut off
  • water

Steps

  1. Preheat the oven to 375F
  2. Cut the top off of your head of garlic, chop onions, peel and break the carrots and celery
  3. Take the tomato puree, and cover all of your bones with a layer, then put the bones and veggies into a roasting pan. This will help brown the bones an adds a delicious flavor to the stock.
  4. Roast on 375 for 30 minutes, then with tongs, flip everything over and put it back in for another 30 minutes
  5. Now, take all of the bones and aromatics from the oven, and put them into your pressure cooker. Take one to two cups of water and pour it into the pan, and scrape all of the bits up, then pour that in as well.
  6. Add your spices and any other additions then pressure cook on high for 75 minutes(electric, for stovetop 60)
  7. Strain your stock and let cool. I let it sit out overnight to allow the fat to rise and harden, making it easy to remove and render.
  8. Once cool, portion and store, or use immediately. Freezes in mason jars for 6 months, refrigerate 3 days.

Notes

  • No pressure cooker? No problem, use a stockpot or big pot on the stove and simmer for 6 to hours or overnight
  • The fat, when seperated, renders down nicely and is great to use when sauteeing. An orange tint is normal, it’s from the liquid in the roaster pan. As far as I can tell, this does not affect flavor or lasting power, and in a sealed jar, this lasts pretty much forever in the fridge.
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